[Law] Advantage criteria

nylluma

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Hello all, I have a question about advantage in general. Law 7 states:

[LAWS]2. Advantage ends when:
a) The referee deems that the non-offending team has gained an advantage. The referee allows play to continue;
[/LAWS]

What are the criteria of the referee on gaining advantage? When does the ref deem an advantage is gained and ends it? Time of possession (if yes, how many secs)? Territory gained (if yes, how many metres)?

Thanks,
Nyll
 
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Taff


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I've been told by assessors that playing advantage is one of my stronger points.

What I find works well is imagining I was in the team who had gained the advantage, and think to myself "Would I rather play on or go for the scrum / PK etc". Eg if there's been a knock-on but the non-offending team are in possession and gaining ground, they obviously don't want to go back for the scrum, so we play on. When they have gained the same or more than they would have gained by say a scrum, then advantage is over.

Makes sense? It's difficult to explain in words, but it makes perfect sense in my head. :biggrin:
 

Balones

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Advantage is not simply related to time or distance. However in general terms you would allow or expect more of each to be the outcome for a penalty than a scrum. The scrum advantage would be the ability to use the ball unpressureised in similar conditions as you would a scrum.

A penalty advantage depends more on game context. If the penalty offence was in the defending 22M then I would not expect much if any advantage to be played. At panel level we would expect a lot more within the opposition half because there should be a reasonable opportunity to gain points since many goal kickers at that level would see that as being possible. Certainly within 40M.

As said above, asking yourself what you would want if you were a player is a reasonable approach to take. But it can be far more complex than that if you start taking into account context. E.g. what is the score at the time and how much time left. A shot at goal is no use if you are 4 points down and 30 seconds left. But with the new laws the oppprtunity to kick for a 5M lineout and subsequent maul would be considered an advantage if time was up.
 
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thepercy


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Scrum Adv. - Territorial or Tactical

PK Adv - Territorial and Tactical
 

crossref


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Scrum Adv .. reached an outcome thats better than a scrum
PK Adv .. reached a outcome thats better than a PK
 

SimonSmith


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Whatever you do, just don't play advantage in hope, which is something I see with a lot of the referees I coach.

When you see the infringement, take a breath and look. If there is something on, call the advantage. If there clearly isn't, or they're just going to play themselves under pressure, just give them the decision.
 

TigerCraig


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Whatever you do, just don't play advantage in hope, which is something I see with a lot of the referees I coach.

When you see the infringement, take a breath and look. If there is something on, call the advantage. If there clearly isn't, or they're just going to play themselves under pressure, just give them the decision.

Especially in lower levels and juniors - they are unlikely to do much with it and if they are only getting a 50 or 60 minute game why waste time of advantage that will never be gained
 

ChrisR

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Scrum Adv .. reached an outcome thats better than a scrum
PK Adv .. reached a outcome thats better than a PK

This makes sense, however . . .

. . . a 5m gain and ball retention after three punches into the line isn't better than a scrum. (not considering dominant scrum, etc.)

In todays game the team carrying the ball into a ruck can expect to recycle but will usually be numerically disadvantaged. Scrums, on the other hand, balance the numbers and are a good attacking platform.
 

beckett50


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Back when the game originated - so I was told - the referee used to sit on the half way line on a device called a shooting stick. It was customary for the non-offending captain to call for an advantage toward the referee who would then grant same.

How true that is I know not, but - as people above have eluded - try and put yourself in the mind of the Captain. Would you want advantage, and what type? If you are getting stuffed at scrum time you wouldn't want a long advantage for a knock-on - as an example of a scrum offence - because coming back for the scrum would be of no advantage to you.

From an attacking viewpoint the Captain would want a long Penalty advantage if his/her team is in the 'Red Zone'.

Likewise is a kick downfield from a player under pressure, or did the player have time to consider their options before executing the play?

I will agree that for someone starting out the advantage Law can be a minefield but for me, and I suspect I am not alone in this, it is the best Law in the book. Like Taff I am always marked well for my use of Advantage.

Don't forget to signal that you are playing advantage and, where you can, the offence. If it is a PK offence you may want to consider lifting your arm from the the horizontal (signalling advantage) to the 45 degree angle and back. Oh, and don't run from phase to phase with your arm out.

Develop your own style, but continue to seek advice.
 
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