coaching jargon

wrighty


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I see theres a thread for referee jargon,but is there one for coaching jargon eg missile,wedge,jackle etc?
 

WombleRef


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As a coach last season that also referee'd society - the two big ones I used were the Jackle and 'D' (my club's shorthand for Defence)
I've found myself calling these out while refereeing.

E.g. - The Jackle was fine or Can we make sure we are onside in D.

Followed by me swearing at myself mentally for slipping into that kind of language.

I generally have found that since moving up north - people don't use the word Jackle. I've had players come up to me and ask - 'What's a Jackle'.
 

Crucial

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That's probably because you are confusing a 'jackle' with a 'jackal' ;)

Jackal being an opportunistic scavenger.

I believe the term started in Australia (that's where I first heard it being used) and possibly around the Brumbies. Jackal-ing for the ball was a specialty of George Smith when others weren't really using the technique and a method of adapting to the change in Law interpretation where prior to that period the ruck was an area for feet, not hands. Hands were likely to suffer damage if they went near the ball at a breakdown in the good old days.

It was around 2004 IIRC that the use of feet died out. I recall John Mitchell as coach of the ABs copping a lot of flak in NZ as he changed style to remove the use of feet (as it was getting penalised more and more) before other teams did. Probably a little too early as it transpired.
 

OB..


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It was 1996 when shoeing players was outlawed. It took some time for certain players to believe the law really meant what it said.
 

WombleRef


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That's probably because you are confusing a 'jackle' with a 'jackal' ;)

Jackal being an opportunistic scavenger.

I believe the term started in Australia (that's where I first heard it being used) and possibly around the Brumbies. Jackal-ing for the ball was a specialty of George Smith when others weren't really using the technique and a method of adapting to the change in Law interpretation where prior to that period the ruck was an area for feet, not hands. Hands were likely to suffer damage if they went near the ball at a breakdown in the good old days.

It was around 2004 IIRC that the use of feet died out. I recall John Mitchell as coach of the ABs copping a lot of flak in NZ as he changed style to remove the use of feet (as it was getting penalised more and more) before other teams did. Probably a little too early as it transpired.

Show off :p

That's quite interesting actually - I just assumed it was spelt Jackle as it was an extra after the Tackle.

(You can tell I am a prop aha)
 
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