Hooker at lineout

Dave Elliott

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So, you watch the prem, hooker is nearly a few inches in field at the line out, on Saturday I had a player with his heels touching the line, just. He said the line is ok.

question is what do you deem as outside the field of play? Is it the line, or outside the line?

E5419BA4-FA26-4425-AE27-C3EBDD6A7017.jpeg

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  1. The player throwing in the ball stands on the mark of touch with both feet outside the field of play. The thrower must not step into the field of play until the ball has been thrown. Sanction: Option of lineout or scrum.
 

Ciaran Trainor


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For me on the line acceptabe. Inside the field of play, warning first and then ping but as may have said except a cup final at the end of the season, I'm on my own every week so unlikely to see it.
 

crossref


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Crossref - law 6 says any part of the foot in the field of play.
The definitions state the field of play goes up to, but does not include the paint.
For me the law means both feet completely outside the line
But I accept that current convention is that both feet touching the line is ok

So , ok, that's fine

But it's not a *materiality* thing..
 

OB..


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If a player with the ball treads on the touchline, you award a lineout. You don't argue about how far in touch he was.

The technical requirement about "any part of either foot" is so widely ignored that it would be unrealistic to suddenly start pinging it.
 

crossref


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If a player with the ball treads on the touchline, you award a lineout. You don't argue about how far in touch he was.

The technical requirement about "any part of either foot" is so widely ignored that it would be unrealistic to suddenly start pinging it.
Agreed, so even 1cm InTouch is in touch . No one says "it's not material"
 

Arabcheif

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Agreed, so even 1cm InTouch is in touch . No one says "it's not material"
Perhaps immaterial was the wrong word. I wasn't talking about materiality the way we as refs understand it. EG if the winger on the openside was a foot offside but the attacking team goes blind... the offside is immaterial as the attacking team went blind side. Going back to the LO issue. I just meant that there's so much we as refs have to look at in a LO, where a Hooker is 10cms (or so) closer than he should be. The advantage gained is minimal and in all likelihood it won't make any difference with the throw. Meaning while I'm looking at that, my focus is away from the 2 lines for a second, I can't see the ball and by the time I look back and process what I'm seeing I'm missing possibly more advantageous (for the team committing them) offences. EG squint throw to the front jumper, that would be missed but it's ok because I can be 100% certain both feet were on the line when the ball was thrown.
 

timmad

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Materiality - yes. What advantage are they gaining? If none, why do they do it? Isn't it just part of the litany of law bending which seems to start at Showbiz level and filter down to grassroots. Squint put-in at scrums, throw to own jumper at line-out, double banking at line-out, flat - or slightly forward - pass / off-load.
I know - #oldfart
 

Camquin

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As a solo ref, all you can do is check they start with their toes off the pitch while they are still messing about with a call, once the two lines are formed there are other things to look for.

But showbiz rugby has no excuse for letting hookers encroach, they have a referee running the line.

It is less egregious than letting a prop bind on the arm, pushing before the ball is in, or <fx:Brian Moore>permitting feeding</fx>.
 

didds

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. For example, a TJ may signal for foul play, but I've never played a game that the ref has ever taken the word of the TJ calling out foul play (however, at my level the TJ is always a sub or volunteer).
can 9s)he? I always thought this was one area that a TJ could NOT call, for exactly those reasons?
 

timmad

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can 9s)he? I always thought this was one area that a TJ could NOT call, for exactly those reasons?
I get my weekly exercise by offering to run touch TJ at local clubs. Most teams seem happy to pass on the job. As non-appointed, i.e. not part of a To3, I'm mostly ignored by the ref and players except, usually, when raising my flag when the ball goes into touch or when a kick at goal is successful. I do try to give the players 5s & 10s at scrums and line-outs. I don't indicate when I see foul play and am guarded giving my view on incidents even if the ref asks. I do usually chat to the ref at half-time - it can be lonely out there and, if he asks, I'm happy to offer 'red always offside on the blind side at rucks' or 'tight head pulling down'.
 

OB..


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Assistant referees and touch judges are responsible for signalling touch, touch in-goal and the success or otherwise of kicks at goal. In addition, assistant referees provide assistance as the referee directs, including the reporting of foul play.

The law also allows a referee to dismiss TJs but not ARs, who are officially appointed and therefore properly qualified. A TJ can be anybody.
 
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