I've been watching games from days of yore

SimonSmith


Referees in Australia
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(Admittedly, it's Scottish Rugby's greatest hits, but I think my points stand)

I've enjoyed watching the matches. And I think I know why.

One game was Ed Morrison doing Scotland/Wales, 1999; the other was david Bishop doing the 1990 Grand Slam.

And boy, are they quick on the whistle. They make instant decisions: the ball's coming back, so we'll let it breathe, or realizing that it's trapped and giving the scrum.

This leads me to a couple of thoughts:
1. Why do the modern Elite seem to have moved away from that. The amount of time allowed by referees, and taken by teams, at the breakdown is killing the game. Everyone realigns and it becomes attritional rugby. The idea of fast moving rucks to create quick ball is prevalent in these older games. Not so much now.
2. And has this phenomenon helped create the injury issues that we see now? Instead of a dynamic phase of play, we now have players in a static position having to withstand impact from an opposition player.

And as a side note, the prevalence of injury stops in the older games is much reduced. I've actually sat and thought: have we lost our way as an Elite sport?
What was so wrong that this endless tinkering has created the quagmire that we so often see?
 

Not Kurt Weaver


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I understand that your questions from your post could be rhetorical, I decided to respond with post since there has not been one. My thoughts in blue


SimonSmith;369918 This leads me to a couple of thoughts: 1. Why do the modern Elite seem to have moved away from that. [B said:
An evolution from immateriality being applied. I have referred to it before as tactit approval. It has led to a cascade of violations to slowly become or morph to acceptance [/B] The amount of time allowed by referees, and taken by teams, at the breakdown is killing the game. Everyone realigns and it becomes attritional rugby. The idea of fast moving rucks to create quick ball is prevalent in these older games. Not so much now. True dat
2. And has this phenomenon helped create the injury issues that we see now? Perhaps, seems likely a cause . Instead of a dynamic phase of play, we now have players in a static position having to withstand impact from an opposition player.

And as a side note, the prevalence of injury stops in the older games is much reduced. I've actually sat and thought: have we lost our way as an Elite sport? Is rugby union an elite sport?
What was so wrong that this endless tinkering has created the quagmire that we so often see? This is a great question, I have been bothered with this query for a time and have given it some thought. I had been looking for "the jump the shark moment", but have concluded with several causes/variants. My synopsis is what I offer below, I hope it helps you

Rugby is not forever. When your time is up and the game has passed you by, allow others to enjoy it however they wish
 
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