[Law] Some new laws to make the game more attractive

CrouchTPEngage


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Just reading that piece my Matt Dawson.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/rugby-union/55120613
He makes some good points.
Whilst , as a ref, its pain to keep changing the laws, I do fear for the future of the game.
Falling numbers of players etc etc. So I am willing to accept some new law variations to help this.

I am reliably told (by experts better than me ) that the reason for the kick-fest is that there is no space in the defence and the laws tend to make it too easy for defenders to get rewarded at jackal-time.
So teams are forced to kick as that gives them (at least ) a 50/50 chance of regaining possession further down the pitch rather than risk an isolated ball-carrier get jackalled and turned-over.

The proposed 50/22 kick idea seems worh a try. ( similar to Rugby League ). And I think I would be OK refereeing that.

Would be interested in other idea that refs have ?
 
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tim White


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One suggestion that I have made before is not to stop the game when a clearly unintentional fumble goes forwards -the delay and confusion seems enough of a punishment.

How about bringing back rucking? -by which I mean all players have to stay on their feet or get out of the way.

How about proper scrummaging?- where no push allowed before the ball comes in ,straight down the middle, so there is a competition for the ball. With the current TV interpretation of the laws it is no wonder we are short of front row players.
 

Wedgie


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How about bringing back rucking? -by which I mean all players have to stay on their feet or get out of the way.

This.

I applaud the current application of the laws on tackled player releasing, but this needs to balanced by correct application of laws about jacklers staying on their feet. A season or two ago there was a law emphasis on jacklers not placing their hands on the ground beyond the ball and then dragging back on to it. This, like many of the "guidances", lasted about, oh, about six weeks and was then forgotten.

Case in point was England's last penalty against Wales when Willis' entire forearm heavily hit the turf beyond the tackled player (and also then the ruck was then formed by Welsh engagement) all before he grabbed the ball.
 

Camquin

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But also we must not let the tackled player play the ball back with their hands when the ball has been lost to the other team. I spotted one with the clock on 49 minutes in the ireland - Italy game.
 

Arabcheif

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But also we must not let the tackled player play the ball back with their hands when the ball has been lost to the other team. I spotted one with the clock on 49 minutes in the ireland - Italy game.


But the tackled player is permitted to push the ball in any direction (except forward). If opposite team have hands on the ball he's not going to be able to do that. I see that as part of the competition for the ball. Unless he's holding onto it then he's not pushing it.
 

Camquin

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I a tackle they are permitted to place the ball immediately.

But
"Once the ruck is formed no player may handle the ball unless they were able to get their hands on the ball before the ruck formed and stay on their feet."

The initial ball carrier has no special dispensation.

So if they lose contact they cannot go back.

So according to the laws, once the ruck forms, they lose the right to place the ball as they are no longer on their feet.
The ruck forming means they were not immediate.
 
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Arabcheif

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Using your criteria of immediately, nothing happens immediately in rugby. You're tackled, you hit the ground - you stop moving then you release. The Laws state you're tackled as soon as you're brought down, thus you must release the ball when you're still moving. Also there can be no pop passes from the ground as this is playing the ball from the ground. There's a multitude of things that say should happen "immediately" but are permitted. If not we'd have basically Rugby League type game that stops and starts every 10-15 seconds on average.
 

Balones

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Having looked closely at recent internationals, Premiership and European games I have come to the conclusion that the ‘handling in ruck’ law is now redundant.
 

Ciaran Trainor


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I would reduce the kick tennis to two per team. Easy to call and scrum to opposition if they do a third.
 

didds

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I would reduce the kick tennis to two per team. Easy to call and scrum to opposition if they do a third.

I wonder if that would perhaps INCREASE the kicking tennis? As now if you can get the oppo to kick first (their own linout deep in their 22?) all you have to do now is kick twice into their 22 again (with no mark opportiunity provided and now the defedning side (ie own half) have to now run it out from deep in their own half - or give up a scrum . In their own 22.

Unless the break in kicking is when one ruck (say) occurs in which casde on the third kick they just set one flop-over ruck and off we go again.

I like the concept - I just dont see how it will end up working.

didds
 
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