Law 19.2 quick throw in

JohnP

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Apologies if this is dealt with elsewhere but i cant see it. Club had a ref come and explain the new rules (changes) and how they saw them refereeing them in National 1. He went through the above rule and from the diagram i the IRB website
quick-throw-in-post-en.jpg

I thought i understood this but asked a question. in the image the kick is from outside the 22 and goes directly in so the line of touch is where the player kicked it. so now the quick throw in is anywhere from players goal line to where the line out would have been: correct?

The question i asked was if the player had been inside his 22 and had 'legally' kicked the ball out on the full then the line of touch is surely where the ball went out not where he kicked it from: correct (or not?)
I heard i was wrong but didnt think it was because i hadnt got my hearing aids in!

Anyone clarify for me please, dont actually think its going to make much difference at Colts (where i coach) but would like to be accurate. Thanks
 

Womble

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all they have changed is line of touch for where the ball crossed the line so yes you are correct
 

Davet

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The Law used to be that the QT could be anywhere from the place where the ball went into touch and the players goal-line, now it is anywhere between the line of touch and the players goal line.

If the kicker is outside his 22 when he kicks direct into touch then the "place where the ball crossed the touchline" is well forward of where the line of touch is - which restricts the location of the QT. The new law extends the range where the QTI may be taken when there is a direct kick to touch outside the 22

If the kicker is inside his 22 and kicks direct to touch, or kicks indirectly to touch from anywhere then the place where the ball crossed the line and the line of touch are the same - so the Law Amendment makes absolutely no difference.

quick-throw-in-post-en.jpgquick-throw-in-pre-en.jpg
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Simon Thomas


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Yes - as Womble & DaveT say - now all about the "line of touch" location, not just where it crossed the line (in case of straight out no gain kicks. That is how RFU explained it to us at the Group L5 meeting last Sunday.
 

PaulDG


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Yes - as Womble & DaveT say - now all about the "line of touch" location, not just where it crossed the line (in case of straight out no gain kicks. That is how RFU explained it to us at the Group L5 meeting last Sunday.

Potentially quite an issue for those of us down in the weeds.

With poorly marked pitches and either no Touch Judges (or TJs that are too busy having a fag on the half-way line), establishing IF a kick was straight out can take time. Time that could now frustrate an otherwise-valid Quick Throw attempt.

Sure, we'll "manage it". As always.
 

Davet

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establishing IF a kick was straight out can take time.

My view would be that down in the weeds if the TJ isn't working then simply decide yourself, don't bother asking the bloke having a fag on the halfway line - his opinion now has zero interest.

Personally if faced with such then I would ask either that someone who is awake please replace him, or do without.

But what the ref should do is decide - instantly, out on full or not. There is no need for a debate.
 

crossref


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with a TJ that you do trust completely it can still be hard - as unless you are miked up there is no easy way for him to communicate with you whether it went out on the full.
- flag up means it was in touch
- keep your other arm down seems to be a recognised signal that the quick throw is still on
that leaves both hands busy.
What can you do to indicate straight out? point your flag not upright, but at an angle back down the pitch toward the LOT?
 

Davet

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as unless you are miked up there is no easy way for him to communicate with you whether it went out on the full.

Other than him running back to the line of touch, perhaps
 

crossref


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Other than him running back to the line of touch, perhaps

but if the quick throw is on, I am not sure that's a good idea - you wouldn't want a AR steaming off to the line of touch while a perfectly legal QT was taken behind him.
 

Davet

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you wouldn't want a AR steaming off to the line of touch while a perfectly legal QT was taken behind him.

No - of course not.

Generally when the ball goes directly into touch a good TJ will raise the flag, then use it to indicate back upfield, then move towards the Line of Touch while watching what is going on, and keeping the non-flag hand down until the QT opportunity is no longer there. If the QT is taken then he will lower the flag.

He isn't going to turn his back on things and race back upfield, but he is going to let you know quite clearly that the LoT is back thataway, and that the QT is still on, and he is watching.

That's what you'd hope for. Generally down in the weeds you take what you get, and don't trust them to find their arse with both hands until they demonstrate capability - and you must be prepared to make your own decisions regardless of what they say or do.
 

4eyesbetter


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with a TJ that you do trust completely it can still be hard - as unless you are miked up there is no easy way for him to communicate with you whether it went out on the full.
- flag up means it was in touch
- keep your other arm down seems to be a recognised signal that the quick throw is still on
that leaves both hands busy.
What can you do to indicate straight out? point your flag not upright, but at an angle back down the pitch toward the LOT?
y

If only there was some other, similar sport that might be able to help you with this problem...

We have a TJ signal for "out on the full"; the TJ waves the flag overhead, with the wave directed towards the kickers' dead ball line. Not easy to miss that one. It works very well.
 
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