Referees eyeware

ChuckieB

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I need to find out about what I can and cannot wear as regards correcting my vision.

I am unable to wear contacts, so what is the guidance for refs on this?

I am thinking I have never seen a ref wearing either specs or anything else? But then I have never really been looking.
 

oldman


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A friend of mine is in a similar position. After much thought he obtained a pair of glasses designed for squash with prescription lenses included. The glasses are designed to take an impact and break with no sharp edges, hence no risk to himself and other players. He referees most weeks and does not seem to have a problem. In fact he often makes a joke, saying at least he is honest with the players, admitting he has an eye-sight problem.
 

Dixie


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Hi ChuckieB. It is a good question - you are right that you rarely see a ref wearing glasses. But this is not (so far as I know) due to any prohibition on spectacles, but rather tends to be a reluctance to give the players any impression that you may be any less than a perfect physical specimen, refereeing their game out of good grace while between junior international obligations.

Some unions have given their blessing to the squash-type specs, at least for junior rugby, though this is probably not strictly relevant here. A referee is automatically exempted from the sort of Health & Safety considerations that would have a player ejected from the field on safety grounds - the pencil, whistle and card wallet are obvious examples of items that no player could legitimately carry on the field of play. In light of that I see no issue with sporting standard-issue specs on the field, but if you go down that route make sure you have some arrangement for securing them above and beyond the normal ear pieces - you don't want then to fall onto the field just as a herd of forwards piles into the ruck.
 

Phil E


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The problem with glasses is when it rains.
 

leaguerefaus


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Why not just paint them on? I've heard that's quite a common thing for referees to do.
 

ChuckieB

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Hi ChuckieB. It is a good question - you are right that you rarely see a ref wearing glasses. But this is not (so far as I know) due to any prohibition on spectacles, but rather tends to be a reluctance to give the players any impression that you may be any less than a perfect physical specimen, refereeing their game out of good grace while between junior international obligations.

Some unions have given their blessing to the squash-type specs, at least for junior rugby, though this is probably not strictly relevant here. A referee is automatically exempted from the sort of Health & Safety considerations that would have a player ejected from the field on safety grounds - the pencil, whistle and card wallet are obvious examples of items that no player could legitimately carry on the field of play. In light of that I see no issue with sporting standard-issue specs on the field, but if you go down that route make sure you have some arrangement for securing them above and beyond the normal ear pieces - you don't want then to fall onto the field just as a herd of forwards piles into the ruck.

i have my adidas evil eyes with clip in corrected lenses which I use for mountain biking . I just don't see them working as well on a pitch. I always played squash with normalish specs, knowing the risk but with no problems.

Obviously rain will be an issue as highlighted. I hadn't really thought on that one!
 

smeagol


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Necro'ing this thread, as I have to stop using contacts until the optometrist gives the green light. I've refereed in glasses for most of the year as a precautionary measure, and sport goggles/glasses aren't happening for another two years unless I hit the powerball.
 

Decorily

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Why not go with the option that is deemed suitable for players?
 

Pablo


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I got laser eye surgery five years ago. One of the best things I have ever spent money on!
 

thepercy


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Why not go with the option that is deemed suitable for players?

Referees don't need to worry about being tackled or getting in rucks, etc.
 

crossref


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Referees don't need to worry about being tackled or getting in rucks, etc.

But it's not uncommon for referees to get knocked over.
You do want glasses that won't fall off, won't hurt anyone and won't get damaged. Ordinary glasses are very fragile (and expensive)

Last season I got a ball in the side of the head. It would have broken the frame of my glasses for sure (had I been wearing any)
 

Decorily

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Referees don't need to worry about being tackled or getting in rucks, etc.
No but they should be aware of the possibility of accidental collisions and for their own, and everybody elses, protection the obvious choice would be the only acceptable option for players!
 

smeagol


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My glasses are for all intents and purposes indestructible (I've worn glasses with flexon frames and polycarbonate lenses for over 20 years). I priced out sport goggles when getting new frames/lenses this week, and it would have been another $300 when I was already spending that much on my main frames/lenses (my insurance only covers one pair of frames per 12 months). I may take another run when I get match fees from the spring and my last 7s gig in just over a week, but I'm skeptical it'll get much better.
 
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