that haka again..

Locke


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Seems to be a solitary opinion here but I enjoy watching the anthems and the haka and whatever else the teams do. For me, it adds to the atmosphere and the passion of the event.

I can agree that having whatever political leader shake every player’s hand can go long and be tiresome but the rest I enjoy. If I watch a replay of a game that I couldn’t catch live, I watch these activities as well; I don’t go forward straight to the kick off. I also enjoy the post match interviews, especially for big games.
 

crossref


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Seems to be a solitary opinion here but I enjoy watching the anthems and the haka and whatever else the teams do. For me, it adds to the atmosphere and the passion of the event.

I can agree that having whatever political leader shake every player’s hand can go long and be tiresome but the rest I enjoy. If I watch a replay of a game that I couldn’t catch live, I watch these activities as well; I don’t go forward straight to the kick off. I also enjoy the post match interviews, especially for big games.
Watching live, I do watch the anthems and haka (the latter with irritation) but if watching a recording I would always fast forward them all
 

didds

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Watching live, I do watch the anthems and haka (the latter with irritation) but if watching a recording I would always fast forward them all
whereas when watching live I sit down as the ref blows his whistle! :D
And I stand up when no-side is blown... personally i cant abide the trite answers to the lets-create-controversy stupid questions :)
 

Harry

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I too enjoy the anthems and the haka as a spectacle. But I understand the reluctance of teams to be forced to stand and watch it.
As to VIP hand shakes er no!
As to politician handshakes, that has no place in any sport for me.
 

Stu10


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crossref


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Not quite about respecting the Haka, but...

If we are going to have a haka at all, then we have to restrict teams to their own half, else a fight is going to break out ... But it does beg the question : why do we even have a haka then

Really, when you think about It, It is about enforced respect for the haka.. you have to give them the space to perform it
 

Dixpat

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If we are going to have a haka at all, then we have to restrict teams to their own half, else a fight is going to break out ... But it does beg the question : why do we even have a haka then

Really, when you think about It, It is about enforced respect for the haka.. you have to give them the space to perform it
We understand you don't like the haka but this discussion is getting tiresome
 

crossref


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well, is the bubble starting to burst ?

ideos appearing to mock the haka have been broadcast by the Spain and Netherlands football teams in the run-up to the Women’s World Cup, which is being co-hosted by New Zealand.

Perhaps football players do not feel so burdened by the heavy traditions of rugby.


from the Torygraph

Videos appearing to mock the haka have been broadcast by the Spain and Netherlands football teams in the run-up to the Women’s World Cup, which is being co-hosted by New Zealand.

A clip showing four Spain players imitating the traditional, ceremonial Maori war dance has been branded “disrespectful” by floods of fans online. The video has since been deleted.

There has been a similarly critical reaction to a post on the official Instagram account of The Netherlands’ team which showed multiple players – including their captain Sherida Spitse – seeming to poke fun at the haka. That has also since been taken down from the Reels section of their Instagram page.

Both Spain and The Netherlands are based on the north island of New Zealand for the upcoming tournament, competing in groups C and E respectively.

Rugby teams representing New Zealand have been performing the haka before international fixtures since at least 1888-89.

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The Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) and the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB) have both been contacted for a response by Telegraph Sport.

Spain will face Japan, Costa Rica and Zambia in Group C, while 2017 European champions The Netherlands are up against the defending world champions the United States, as well as Portugal and Vietnam.

Fifa have already announced that indigenous flags of Australia and New Zealand will be on display during the World Cup.

“An important step in the delivery and preparation of the tournament was the establishment of an all-women cultural advisory panel to create enduring relationships in partnership with First Nations and Maori communities and to ensure meaningful engagement and inclusion for all cultural touchpoints across the tournament,” Fifa president Gianni Infantino said.

“These significant flags express a spirit of mutual respect, national identity and recognition of Indigenous cultures for our hosts.”

Meanwhile, throughout the tournament, Fifa will feature the English and traditional First Nation translation of each host city and place name in use for the event.
 

didds

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Im in the "bored now" camp wrt the haka. But the football thing seems more than a bit odd.
 

RemainingInTheGame


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well, is the bubble starting to burst ?

ideos appearing to mock the haka have been broadcast by the Spain and Netherlands football teams in the run-up to the Women’s World Cup, which is being co-hosted by New Zealand.

Perhaps football players do not feel so burdened by the heavy traditions of rugby.


from the Torygraph
Easy to mock a haka in soccer without our tackles and clean outs.

I'm not sure I'd ever disrespect a haka before a game, unless I 100% wanted a physically brutal game.

If I was a coach I'd probably be wanting to make the gap between the haka and kick off as long as possible, and look for a way to re-warm my players (I think there has been some suggestion that the team conducting the haka has an advantage as they stay warmed up while the opposing team gets cold).
 

SimonSmith


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Perhaps football players do not feel so burdened by the heavy traditions of rugby.
This is where I start to get uneasy. I understand that not everyone is a fan of the haka.

But it strikes me that there is cultural overtone, or undertone to this, that gets easily overlooked. The haka is a cultural touchtone for New Zealanders. I'm not sure there is an English equivalent, but your post strikes me as, politely, possibly blind to the cultural nuances at play in the former colonial possessions.

And the footballers are just arseholes.
 

Dixpat

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This is where I start to get uneasy. I understand that not everyone is a fan of the haka.

But it strikes me that there is cultural overtone, or undertone to this, that gets easily overlooked. The haka is a cultural touchtone for New Zealanders. I'm not sure there is an English equivalent, but your post strikes me as, politely, possibly blind to the cultural nuances at play in the former colonial possessions.

And the footballers are just arseholes.
Agree

it was offensive and has seen to be so in NZ
 

crossref


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So those three posts are getting to the nub of the problem .. for important reasons ( that dixpat, Simon and ritg outline, and I agree with ) it IS effectively necessary to just stand there and respect the haka.

There is no other realistic way to behave

Which is why there shouldn't be one
 
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Dickie E


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Maybe the opposition should "take the knee" (remember that?). That'd confuse everyone 😀
 

Marc Wakeham


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This is where I start to get uneasy. I understand that not everyone is a fan of the haka.

But it strikes me that there is cultural overtone, or undertone to this, that gets easily overlooked. The haka is a cultural touchtone for New Zealanders. I'm not sure there is an English equivalent, but your post strikes me as, politely, possibly blind to the cultural nuances at play in the former colonial possessions.

And the footballers are just arseholes.
I'm not sure that the All Blacks (excepting the Maoris, possibly?) took the Haka that seriously in 1970s. It seems to have increased in importance in the past 20 or so years. Is it not more a Maori thing that a NZ thing?

Your third paragraph? 100% agree.
 

didds

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I'm not sure that the All Blacks (excepting the Maoris, possibly?) took the Haka that seriously in 1970s. It seems to have increased in importance in the past 20 or so years. Is it not more a Maori thing that a NZ thing?

Your third paragraph? 100% agree.
ISTR it was Buck Shelford that brought it the position it has now. Some where in this thread is the limp wristed 1970s effort that looks more like unskilled morris dancers...
 

SimonSmith


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I'm not sure that the All Blacks (excepting the Maoris, possibly?) took the Haka that seriously in 1970s. It seems to have increased in importance in the past 20 or so years. Is it not more a Maori thing that a NZ thing?

Your third paragraph? 100% agree.
I think the separation of Maori from NZ isn't where NZ as a country is right now. Rightly or wrongly, I get the feeling that they see the two as integrated, and not separate. Whether or not that is wholly true in fact, as opposed to aspirationally, is a different question.
 
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