Unofficial referee signals?

RemainingInTheGame


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I have noticed some of the northern hemisphere referees using a signal for ‘off feet’ as a secondary signal - arm out, starting low then moving up in a lifting up type movement (not a great description, and could not find a clip to show).

Are there other non official but useful signals out there?
 

Decorily

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I have noticed some of the northern hemisphere referees using a signal for ‘off feet’ as a secondary signal - arm out, starting low then moving up in a lifting up type movement (not a great description, and could not find a clip to show).

Are there other non official but useful signals out there?
If it gets the message across then it's acceptable...official or unofficial!
 

SimonSmith


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I have noticed some of the northern hemisphere referees using a signal for ‘off feet’ as a secondary signal - arm out, starting low then moving up in a lifting up type movement (not a great description, and could not find a clip to show).

Are there other non official but useful signals out there?
If it's the one I'm thinking of, with palms up, that was an official tertiary signal for a long time.
 

RemainingInTheGame


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If it's the one I'm thinking of, with palms up, that was an official tertiary signal for a long time.
Yes, that’s the one.

I was was wondering if I am missing some great signals because I’m not aware of them!
 

Dickie E


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If it's the one I'm thinking of, with palms up, that was an official tertiary signal for a long time.
if that's the tertiary signal, what's the secondary signal?
 

SimonSmith


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if that's the tertiary signal, what's the secondary signal?
As I remember it, the sequence was:
Whistle, primary for penalty.
Secondary was going off feet - the "airplane landing" signal.
Tertiary was this, indicating "please stay on your feet"

As always, I stand to be corrected,
 

RemainingInTheGame


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As I remember it, the sequence was:
Whistle, primary for penalty.
Secondary was going off feet - the "airplane landing" signal.
Tertiary was this, indicating "please stay on your feet"

As always, I stand to be corrected,
Is there any list of Tertiary signals? (I can't find any reference to anything online, only Primary and Secondary)
 

SimonSmith


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I've just realized this discussion about tertiary signals makes me feel very old in refereeing terms.
 

Zebra1922


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The rolypoly signal for players rolling on the ground after the tackle to prevent a jackel.
 

Phil E


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There are a lot of signals used at the top level that don't exist in the good book.
Some of them for offences that also don't appear in the good book.

i.e. standing up at the scrum.
 

Stu10


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There are a lot of signals used at the top level that don't exist in the good book.
Some of them for offences that also don't appear in the good book.

i.e. standing up at the scrum.
Is standing up at the scrum actually the offense, or is the penalty for changing/breaking bind (law 19.11.d), or something else (honest question, I'm not sure the answer)?
 

didds

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I thought it was "not pushing straight" ?

Which is the same law applied, in conjunction with losing binds, that now makes "destroyed scrums" a PK.
Merely my 2p, in a minority of one, but if that interpretation was avoided (scrum Pks for being smashed) then _maybe_ the scrum-as-a-PK-machine approach _might_ slope away....

with the thought that a smashed scrum is good go forward ball for the smashers...
 

crossref


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On a serious note, I wish there was a different signal for a scrum adv and penalty adv

Mostly, it's not necessary, everyone can tell from context ... But there are times when more precise signals would be useful
 

Dickie E


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One of the most useful is the knocked back signal and associated words that indicate that the referee has seen the player make contact with the ball and decided that it is not a knock on
 

crossref


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Another useful unofficial signal is the swipe to indicate a missed kick

Another useful one is players in a noisy stadium using the FK signal to indicate they want a mark
 
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chbg


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Another useful one is players in a noisy stadium using the FK signal to indicate they want a mark

Which now seems to be the official claim for a Mark. I can't remember when I last actually heard a loud call!
 

Phil E


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I once got marked down by an assessor for not giving a mark (before the trend of indicating with an arm).
The player caught it and as he did I was right in front of him. I watched very carefully and his mouth never opened....but everyone else on his team shouted "Mark".

I called play on no mark and he got clattered.

Assessor said I heard him call mark, I said no, you heard his teammates call mark, he never said a word.
Assessor said that should have been good enough!
 
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