Wales v Australia: final try

Dickie E


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the opposition jumpers are disadvantaged obviously. Particularly those closer to bthe front of the lineout who have no chance of challenging for the ball.
depends which way the wind is blowing
 

didds

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I know you're not a ref, but are you saying that any lineout throw that doesn't start straight or end up straight, should be pinged?
Im actualply struggling to think why it wouldnt be?
as i said - if its that bloody windy come up with alternative strategies. I can think of at least three off the top of my head immediately. they mauy not be conducive to beign able to spread the ball wide off the top most efficiently - but they would retain ball and not provide the oppo with a string of scrums.

Of course if my scrum is totally mullering the oppo's then do what whatever as we'll win the ball anyway!
 

Dickie E


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Im actualply struggling to think why it wouldnt be?
as i said - if its that bloody windy come up with alternative strategies. I can think of at least three off the top of my head immediately. they mauy not be conducive to beign able to spread the ball wide off the top most efficiently - but they would retain ball and not provide the oppo with a string of scrums.

Of course if my scrum is totally mullering the oppo's then do what whatever as we'll win the ball anyway!
yeah, OK. I can see that
 

Rich_NL

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Conversely: the team that is playing into the wind throws the ball to a pod nearer the back. It's straight enough at 5 but way over any contesting players, and it's caught half a metre *outside* the outside shoulder, outstretched arm, with the opponent not having the slightest chance of coming anywhere near it. Play on?

Reduction ad absurdum: it's straight over the 5, and blows back to the receiver standing 2m back on the 15 without being touched. Play on?
 

jdeagro


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It's straight enough at 5 but way over any contesting players, and it's caught half a metre *outside* the outside shoulder, outstretched arm, with the opponent not having the slightest chance of coming anywhere near it. Play on?

If I'm envisioning this correctly - starts straight until it cross the 5m and then curves outside the lineout almost (or over the heads of throwing teams line of players in the lineout) and comes back into the lineout near the 15m. That's definitely not a play on for me.
 

Volun-selected


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In theory, the ball should leave the throwers hands and pass down the middle of both teams along the LoT. In the real world we normally allow some leeway - for example as long as it starts straight and stays at least between the teams. That leeway is dependent on the level of the teams - I’m giving 8 year old newbies way more than experienced adults.

If I insisted the ball stay exactly over the LoT for the full length of the lineout - well, with the teams I often see that would be a very tall order even on good days. I have to be practical in the application.

For me, the ball should enter the space between the first two players in the lineout on the LoT (or very close to it). Could be a couple of inches off the ground or 10ft at the 5m line, but must be over the LoT.

It should then at least stay between the players - if it started straight but by the last competing pair it’s still at least between them then I’ll play on to at least keep it flowing.

If it’s blowing down the pitch so hard that even a fast ball will drift wide before the end of the lineout, I expect the thrower to adjust and not throw as far, or the pack to catch near the front and understand that slow balls and longer throws are more impacted by wind than fast and short.

If this gives an advantage to one team, then it is usually only a slight advantage and it’s only on one side of the pitch. On the other line, sauce for the goose is also sauce for the gander. It will also be swapped in the next half.

We play an outdoor game, adjusting to the elements is part and parcel of that.
 
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